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Jamming Issue: Solved


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#1 kwaispro727

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:23 PM

So my issue had previously only happened when my LM4 was subjected to cold for extended periods of time.  I may not have mentioned this, but both types of jam typically occur when I try to do double taps, or really any firing where the gun is cycling repeatedly.

Today it's about 40 degrees here.  I also received my frog lube a while back.  Great stuff, smells like mint.  It's worth it just so you can say hey my gun smells like mint in my opinion lol.  Anyhow, I loaded up a mag with 30 rounds, and emptied a mag, quickly.  First full auto, some quick semi shots skeptically, and then as fast as I could pull the trigger, and ended with full auto until it the mag ran dry.

I then proceeded to put my LM4 in my freezer for 10 minutes, during which my girlfriend was extremely confused when she opened the freezer.  That's another story ;p

I took it out put in a magazine of the same temperature as the first round of shooting, and begun again.  I got through the full auto burst alright.  Then I tried to shoot my semi very quickly.  

Second shot.  Case in point.  Gun jammed with the BB sitting on the cocked hammer. Cleared it.

Fifth shot.  Same issue.  Cleared it.

Seventh shot.  Same problem, different scenario.  I got some kind of triple or double feed in the hop-up.  Cleared it without an issue though.

I should also mention two weeks ago, when my friend was over, we shot the gun outside at about 60 degrees with no issues at all.  So what does all of this mean?  It means that I have a very temperature sensitive LM4.  The interesting thing is that it's actually the gun that suffers, not the magazine and it's gas.  There has never been any kind of issue with my LM4 and gas usage, even with the rocket valve mod done.

If anyone else is having double feeding issues, and you are shooting in the cold, try letting the gun warm up, and then just run outside and dump a mag.  If you're gun functions normally, I guarantee you your situation is the same as mine.  My personal theory is that for some reason the cold causes the barrel movement everyone else has talked about, for which boobiem4h has show a mod that will fix it.

#2 netpoc

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 04:22 PM

I think you'll find the problem is from the lubricant freezing from the added cold of the green gas/propane. I had a similar problem from the cold; the piston was actually freezing the lubricant in the cylinder because of the cold ambient temperature and the added cold of the gas, causing the gun to freeze after a trigger pull and not cycle.

#3 Chuck S

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 03:54 AM

Read the section on Froglube dot Com on Cold Weather operation.  About midway down this page:  http://froglube.com/...stions-answers/. (And quoted below.)  Like any arctic lubricant ALL old, thick lubricant must be removed first and the lubricant applied sparingly.

Airsoft guns need minimal lubrication to start with.  If you can push it around with your finger there's too much.  Just make it shiny on the wear points.

-- Chuck

How do I use FrogLube in cold weather?


Always follow manufacturers instructions for your firearm. FrogLube is designed for arctic use. When you follow FrogLube directions, your lubricant is contained “within” your firearm, not “on” it. You should “winterize” your firearm before the onset of cold temps. Use FrogLube “Dry – Clean” Solvent to remove excess lube and protectant film. Wipe Dry. Use FrogLube CLP lube very sparingly. Your firearm is now ready for cold temperatures. For comprehensive instructions, follow the guidance provided in professional manuals such as the US Army’s Field Manual FM 31-70, Chapter 6. Excerpt; “DURING THE WINTER, WEAPONS MUST BE STRIPPED COMPLETELY AND CLEANED WITH A DRY – CLEANING SOLVENT TO REMOVE ALL LUBRICANTS AND RUST PREVENTION COMPOUNDS.”- See more at: http://froglube.com/...h.QEOyK0yT.dpuf

  

Edited by Chuck S, 25 March 2014 - 03:55 AM.


#4 kwaispro727

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:05 AM

I actually did see that Chuck, and I made sure all the other lubricant was gone before using the frog lube.

#5 Chuck S

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 02:54 PM

Moving on to more extreme things to try.

Try running the gun dry.  Wipe off everything.

And, if possible, leave the gun outdoors or in an unheated garage or shed.  Bringing a cold gun indoors will cause condensation on the gun -- and inside the gun -- from moist indoor air (outdoor air is practically devoid of humidity below 0°C/32°F).  Even if you're not out in those temperatures the gun gets very cold with firing from the evaporation of the propellant when released.  Ice can form.  Lubricants turn to grease.  (During military arctic operations the weapons never go inside a building or tent.  We cover them to keep the snow off but the guns stay outdoors at ambient temperature.)

-- Chuck




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